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Thursday, 21 September

21:44

Chinese dairy company Yili makes substantial offer for Murray Goulburn "IndyWatch Feed Melbourne"

A CHINESE dairy juggernaut is courting Australias biggest milk processor, Murray Goulburn Cooperative, lobbing a buyout offer for the group, sources say.

Yili, which makes milk products for the Chinese market, is rumoured to the be in the box seat for the struggling Melbourne-based cooperative after tabling a substantial offer.

Confirming last month that it had slumped into the red during the year to June, Murray Goulburn also revealed it had fielded buyout bids and offers for some of its assets.

A buyout by an offshore group such as Yili would face scrutiny from the Foreign Investment Review Board.

media_camera

Murray Goulburn chief executive Ari Mervis. Picture: Aaron Francis

Industry experts say any deal would likely need the backing of 90 per cent of Murray Goulburns farmer suppliers under its co-op structure. As such, the government would be less likely to overturn a deal even if the review board had concerns, they say.

Other bidders are said to include listed company Bega Cheese, Chinese group Fuyuan Farming, New Zealand dairy processing titan Fonterra and Canadian heavyweight Saputo, which already owns Warrnambool Cheese and Butter.

Italian dairy titan Parmalat, Japans Lion, Singapore-owned Goodman Fielder and New Zealands A2 Milk which is listed on...

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Wednesday, 20 September

12:03

Childrens Gallery a first for regional Australia The Shepparton Adviser

Childrens Gallery a first for regional Australia

ART FOR THE KIDS The new Shepparton Art Museum will be home to the first regional Australian Childrens Gallery. Photo: Supplied.

PARENTS, teachers and visitors will welcome the first spaces in any gallery in regional Australia to be dedicated to meeting the specific creative needs of children.

These spaces will be provided in the new Shepparton Art Museum (SAM), and will include both indoor and outdoor places purpose-designed to encourage even the youngest visitors to explore and become more aware of their immediate surrounds.

They will be stimulated to touch, see, hear and feel to satisfy their curiosity and natural desire for learning in opportunities impossible to provide in the current SAM building.

The childrens gallery and outdoor space will encourage curiosity and learning through the sensory, emotional and intellectual stimulation of the children. Experiences will include a dedicated Childrens Gallery and Art Play space curated by artists alongside the temporary exhibition gallery. There will also be an outdoor clay playground to allow visitors to explore the materials used in the making of ceramics, inspiring interest and introducing children through play to SAMs unique collection of ceramics.

The vision for these art spaces includes experiences for school groups. Working with educational partners, the new SAM will deliver services to cater for curriculum needs from pre-school to tertiary programs.

As Kidstown has drawn tourists to Greater Shepparton, it is expected that this unique Childrens Gallery will draw visitors from across the nation. Taking account of the varied and specific needs and abilities of children, the arts precinct by the lake will be a welcome resource for parents, grandparents, teachers, students and tourists alike.

12:02

Final nominees named as businesses prepare for announcement of category winners The Shepparton Adviser

Final nominees named as businesses prepare for announcement of category winners

THE FINAL nominees for the 2017 White King-Pental 95.3 Triple M Business Awards have been named, and now each of the 100 nominees from this years awards are eagerly awaiting the Gala Dinner and Awards Evening, to discover who will be crowned the winners of each category.

This week, Trevor Phillips Photographics received a nomination under the Customer Service of the Year Professional Services category, Shop 221 received a nomination under the Business Award Retail Services category, The Carrington received a nomination under the Visitor Experience of the Year category, GV Ls 2 Ps received a nomination under the Best New Business Under Two Years category, MBCM Shepparton received a nomination under the Best New Business Under Two Years category, Furphy Foundry apprentice fabricator engineer, Adam Menzie received a nomination under the Apprentice/Trainee of the Year category and All Farm Gates received a nomination under the GV Healthy Workplace category.

All nominees will have the opportunity to attend the 22nd annual Gala Dinner and Awards Evening on Friday, October 6 at the Eastbank Centre, where winners of each category will be named. Tickets can be purchased at the Riverlinks Box Office, 90 Welsford Street, Shepparton or by phoning 5832 9511. Ticket sales close at 5pm on Monday, October 2.

12:00

Biodiversity grants announced for Shepparton groups The Shepparton Adviser

THE Andrews Labor Government has announced an additional $4M in community biodiversity grants funding for 110 projects across the state as part of its support for the Biodiversity On-ground Action program.

Member for Northern Victoria, Mark Gepp said local community initiatives, such as the Breathing Life into the Bushland and the renewal of threatened plant conservation projects along the Broken-Boosey-Nine Mile Creek system, will receive part of the $4M in funding to help protect, improve and expand habitats for Victorias native plants and animals.

Friends of the Australian Botanic Gardens Shepparton will receive a $29,092 community biodiversity grant to help them conserve and improve the significant urban bushlands of the Australian Botanic Gardens in Shepparton.

Goulburn Valley Environment Group will receive $44,945 in community biodiversity grant to enable themto re-assess the status of habitats and species populations along the Broken-Boosey-Nine Mile Creek system and other reserves in the eastern Northern Plains.

Mr Gepp said, Many people within our rural communities are already hard at work helping protect and preserve local native flora and fauna.

In the last year many dedicated local community groups inNorthern Victoriahelped to reduce threats and improve the survival of threatened species.

The Government is committed to biodiversity and encourages Victorians to learn more and participate in their local community, Mr Gepp said.

Community Biodiversity Grants of up $50,000 each have been allocated to 110 projects across Victoria.

12:00

Community Connect The Shepparton Adviser

UPCOMING

 

THE SHEPPARTON SENIORS CONCERT will be held on Thursday, September 28 from 1:30pm at the Welsford Street centre. Guest artist is Johnny Doyle. Entry is $5, which includes afternoon tea. Everyone is welcome. For enquiries or bookings, phone 5821 4921 or 5821 9580.

 

THE ST AUGUSTINES OLD TIME DANCE will run on Saturday, September 30 from 8pm to 12pm at the St Augustines Hall on Orr Street, Shepparton. Music will be by Jan Dohertys Splinters Live Band. There will be a program of old time favourite dances, lucky spots, door prizes and raffles. Proceeds go to Shepparton Uniting Church Building Fund. All welcome. Admission is $8. Please bring a plate to share. For enquiries, contact Ted on 5822 0424.

 

SENIORS WEEK BUS TRIP is run by Murchison Neighbourhood House and will be going to Cactus Country Strathmerton on Wednesday, October 18. Cost is $35 and covers morning tea, entry, lunch and afternoon tea. Leaves Murchison at 9am with pick up in Mooroopna and Shepparton available (please ask when booking). Seats are limited and bookings are required by phoning 5826 2373 between 9:30am and 2:30pm weekdays.

 

THE SALVATION ARMY THRIFT SHOP is now open between 9:30am and 4:30pm every Saturday. Come in and see us for a friendly chat and find yourself some bargains at 3 Mill Street, Mooroopna.

 

DO YOU OR A FAMILY MEMBER HAVE ASTHMA? Come along to a free community education session at North Shepparton Community & Learning Centre (training delivered by The Asthma Foundation Victoria). Here you will find out more about Thunderstorm Asthma, who is at risk, how to perform Asthma First Aid and the link between Asthma and hay fever.  Phone (03) 5821 5770 to reserve your spot.

 

BISHOP LESLIE AND THE SANDHURST DIOCESE will celebrate the 100th anniversary of the final apparition of Our Lady of Fatima, which accrued on October 13, 1917 and culminated with the astounding miracle of the sun. 11am Mass will be held at Sacred Heart Cathedral Bendigo. St Brendans Parish is organising a whole day bus trip to the October Marian Festival in Bendigo on Sunday, October 8. All are cordially invited to join in the celebration. Bookings at St Brendans Parish, 121 Knight Street, Shepparton before September 22. More information on the Parish Bulletin or phone Bozena on 0426 867 647.

 

 

 

ONGOING

MENTAL WELLBEING: DEPRESSED? ANXIOUS? ISOLATED? SUFFERING GRIEF OR LOSS? KNOW SOMEONE WHO IS? The Shepparton Grow group meets weekly to offer peer support and use a proven program for mental wellbeing on Wednesdays from 1pm at 11 Service Street, Shepparton. All welcome. For further information, contact Lindy on 0448 052 769.

 

...

12:00

Letters to the Editor The Shepparton Adviser

TIME FOR SPORTS TO SHARE THE SPOILS

Dear Editor,

One of the success stories of the Greater Shepparton City Council over the past decade has been its impressive roll out of major sporting events. This has been well delivered by the current council events team who have built upon the exceptional legacies of former managers who had the vision and insight to plan and develop facilities that can host major events.

Despite this success and the many millions of dollars generated each year for our economy, it is time that local sporting bodies that make these events possible receive greater financial support from the council. Despite the many thousands of hours these organisations contribute to these major events, financial returns are minimal.  Burn out of volunteers with little reward for efforts is not a sustainable path.

Councillors have a unique opportunity to build upon the benefits of developing infrastructure for major sporting events, by establishing a funding program to create 3-5 year strategic partnerships with sporting organisations that can attract events and visitors to Greater Shepparton and deliver economic benefits to our community.

This funding program would recognise the need to ensure that sporting organisations have the staff and resources to remain sustainable and can more effectively contribute to the social and economic well being of our region. The regions major events calendar will grow with the type of support.

Maybe some of the few million dollars a year the council spends on publicity and propaganda promoting its achievements (also known as delivering services) could be diverted to a more positive use and fund a Sports Strategic Partnership Program. Lets say $300,000 for starters in 2018.

Yours sincerely,

Brendan Gosstray

Kialla

 

JUDGE AND EXPOSE FALSE TEACHERS

Dear Editor,

I take exception to the push of gay marriage with liberal supporters like Frank Purcell (recently in the media), because he is the fruit of a secular world and where does he get his figures from?

It is only natural that there will be people with different views but what do they base them on? Frank is not setting a moral example for people to follow because he is luke warm and Jesus had a bit to say about that

(Rev 3:15, 16).

As a fundamentalist I base my beliefs on what the bible teaches because it is a truth far beyond the wisdom of man. If we call ourselves Christian we bear the name of Christ and in doing so we have to believe what He teaches and gay marriage is not a part of it.

The bible is full of warnings of what will happen to those who tread the path of secularism and human reasoning (1 Tim 1:10).

It also warns us to judge and expose false teachers. These warnings need to be taken seriously because most churches wil...

11:59

Schools could unite under new education plan The Shepparton Adviser

FOUR schools across the Shepparton region could unite under the Andrews Labor Governments plan for improving education across as part of a new Shepparton Education Plan.

The plan will look at learning opportunities from birth to post-secondary, however many of the initial findings relate to the structure and operation of the regions secondary schools.

The latest phase of consultation will consider proposed scenarios of how Sheppartons secondary education could look into the future. The options already developed through the first phase of consultation with the community include the regions four schools remain operating as is, the four schools remain with minor improvements, one secondary school on one main campus with an additional tech school and Mooroopna precinct development and one secondary school on two campuses, additional tech school and Mooroopna precinct development.

As part of the transformational change, suggestions for a number of options for new facilities are to be considered, including a new secondary school, a new tech school, a Mooroopna precinct redevelopment and a new integrated childrens centre.

Further options for consideration will be enhancing teacher capabilities, upgrading school facilities and establishing new approaches to teaching and learning that put students first.

Feedback from the second consultation phase will be used to guide the continued development of the Shepparton Education Plan, with a final recommendation due to government early next year. The Shepparton Education Plan will be delivered over three stages this first stage focusing on the towns secondary schools.

Minister for Education, James Merlino said, We want to genuinely look at all options and to have an open conversation with the community about opportunities and benefits as well as challenges and constraints.

The community has spoken, it wants to see change so the young people of Shepparton and Mooroopna have better access to a high quality education and we are listening.

11:59

Saving the future of our children The Shepparton Adviser

Saving the future of our children

A PLAYFUL, YET EFFECTIVE THERAPY METHOD From left, Local paediatrician, Dr Peter Eastaugh and Therapeutic Play Specialist and Interventional Therapeutic Play program coordinator, Peta Van Popering have been working to create better outcomes for local children who are at risk of becoming disengaged later in life, through a unique and revolutionary therapeutic play program. Photo: David Lee.

Revolutionary program creating better outcomes for children at risk of becoming disengaged

THE lives and future direction of hundreds of children across Greater Shepparton are already on the path to improvement thanks to a unique psychotherapy through play program being run at schools, and this is only the beginning for the revolutionary program.

The Interventional Therapeutic Play program, which aims to curb the negative future outcomes for those that have acquired neurological impairments stemming from early childhood environmental trauma, has seen accredited therapeutic play specialists hired from the beginning of the year to work with schools and parents to identify at risk children, and work with them to improve their educational and relationship outcomes, eventually leading the child to go on and be positively and actively involved in the community.

Local paediatrician, Dr Peter Eastaugh said, The statistics that we are gathering are already showing that there is a real problem and we have let this issue get out of control.

The number of children who have experienced environmental trauma that has had an impact on their growth has increased by 10 fold in the last 20 years.

Programs like this can make a huge difference to the lives of children.

They give us an opportunity to intervene and change the trajectory that the childrens lives may take.

Studies suggest that most adult family violence behaviour comes from early childhood, so early intervention is important.

In 2011, there were in excess of 200 children from schools in the Shepparton district who were on a waiting list for developmental or behavioural paediatric assessment, with approximately 50 percent of these children attending the Shepparton Neighbourhood Schools, which is a collaborative effort of five schools across the Shepparton region who service some of the most disadvantaged communities/children in the Shepparton region.

Upon identifying the need to act early, the neighbourhood schools partnered with myself to provide paediatric services to those children who attended the sc...

11:58

Sports precinct opens The Shepparton Adviser

THIS Friday will see a series of celebrations taking place in recognition of the hard work that has brought the vision for the Greater Shepparton Regional Sports Precinct to a reality.

The sports precinct is a unique facility that is rarely found in a regional area, a facility that will reinforce Greater Shepparton as regional Australias sporting capital.

Work commenced on the precinct back in early 2015 starting with the construction of the synthetic hockey pitch evolving into a $21M state-of-the-art sporting venue.

The sports precinct will provide a significant boost to the local economy and will ensure that Greater Shepparton remains a leader in the hosting of major sporting events. The sporting precinct is anticipated to create visitation of approximately 265,000 participants, officials and spectators over 10 years for national and state-wide events alone, approximately 132,500 of whom will be from outside the region.

Visitor spending to the region will approximately be to the value of $82M over 10 years or $8.2M per year. The precinct will support approximately 105 full time jobs on an ongoing basis in visitor-related sectors such as accommodation, retail, cafes and restaurants.

Greater Shepparton City Council Mayor, Cr Dinny Adem said, This is undeniably a world class facility that we in Greater Shepparton should be immensely proud of.

We can see that the years of hard work have paid off, with a facility that can be utilised and enjoyed by our community, while having the potential to attract and host national and international events. Its the perfect blend.

Goulburn Valley Hockey Association president, Ian Ritchie said, Having access to two fields has now given the Association a great deal of flexibility in hosting more matches in Shepparton, particularly when accommodating competing teams from Euroa, Benalla, Echuca and Bendigo.

The redevelopment of the hockey fields, together with the soccer, netball and athletics tracks is certainly making the precinct very attractive to other user groups, particularly schools, as the precinct now is a one-stop shop for a wide range of sports activities.

Shepparton South Soccer Club president, Gino Cirillo said, We have found the new precinct to be a huge improvement, and were fortunate that we can play on fields of such quality.

The beauty of the precinct is that it will entice young kids to play soccer and their families to come along to watch. Were also hoping to see many national and international competitions come to Shepparton to use these great the facilities, Mr Cirillo said.

Shepparton Netball Association president, Diane Orr said, The new Shepparton Sports Precinct has given our community a first class sporting facility which is well laid out, easily accessible and will be a significant drawcard for major sporting events in this region for many years to come. Shepparton Netball Association congratulate...

11:56

Get body corporate advice from the experts The Shepparton Adviser

Get body corporate advice from the experts

SIMPLIFYING BODY CORPORATE MANAGEMENT MBCM Strata Specialists are made up of two very knowledgeable and likeable professionals who will help you get the best out of your investment. From left, co-directors, Amelia Wright and Emma Glazebrook. Photo: Nicholise Garner.

MBCM co-directors, Amelia Wright and Emma Glazebrook are thrilled to have won two awards at the recent MBCM Strata Specialists Franchise Awards the Community Spirit award for their work with the MBCM Northern Country Womens League this season and the award for Excellence in Sales and Marketing for 2017.

Amelia said, Were really proud of the work that we do and we really want to help people understand how body corporates work. For anyone who already owns or is thinking of buying a unit in a body corporate, we are launching our strata community advisory sessions on Tuesday October 3 at 6pm with a free, no obligation information night, open to anyone with any interest in body corporates or owners corporations, such as developers, owners, investors and agents.

There will be a short presentation on the basics of Owners Corporations and then an open Q&A session for anyone to raise any queries they may have in relation to units, body corporates, rules and regulations, rights and responsibilities etc. Refreshments will be served.

MBCM Strata Specialists have moved to a new purpose designed office at 98A Wyndham Street in Shepparton. Check out MBCMs new offices at the free owner information session on Tuesday October 3: To register your interest, call Emma or Amelia on03 5831 2913 or email us at info@mbcmshepparton.com.au

11:55

Stephens new Marketplace store The Shepparton Adviser

Stephens new Marketplace store

JUST IN TIME FOR THEIR BIG SPRING SALE From left, Stephens Jewellers second in charge, Annie Dimitipoulos and sales assistant, Mary Mulkeen are enjoying their beautiful new work space. Photo: Nicholise Garner.

STEPHEN Schneider owner of Stephens Jewellers is very proud to bring his vision of sleek modern store design and functionality to Shepparton Marketplace.

Stephen said, Weve come a long way since the beginning of our journey as Shepparton Showcase Jewellers in Fryers Street, Shepparton, back in 1994. The new Shepparton Marketplace store is a design three years in the making and draws on design elements gathered in more than 20 years of research of the jewellery industry within Australia and internationality.

We have once again partnered with several local professional trades to deliver the end result and wed like to thank prominent local businesses Kitchenwise, Moretto Building, Midland Electrical, Mooroopna Glass, Signs and Lines and Shepparton Carpet court for their commitment to this project. We are all very proud of the end result and to be nominated in the 2017 Shepparton Chamber of Commerce retail Business awards is a nice acknowledgement.

For Lisa, Annie and the Stephens Jewellers Marketplace customer service team, the sleek store delivers some amazing new jewellery collections and shopping experiences to their consumers. Such as the latest Shop in Shop experience from PANDORA Jewellery the worlds most popular jewellery collection. Stephen has also introduced a new collection of unique Australian Argyle Diamond set jewellery into the new store.

Stephens Jewellers Marketplace sales team leader, Lisa said, We have also been conscious of maintaining the quality jewellery and watch brands our Shepparton Marketplace customers have enjoyed over the past 18 years. We pride ourselves on delivering a quality gift giving opportunity across all price points.

Stephens Jewellers Shepparton Marketplace is open 7 days a week and most public holidays for added shopping convenience.

Tuesday, 19 September

15:56

Hannah Fiddelaers on the move Goulburn Valley Community Legal Centre

hannahOur lovely young lawyer colleague, Hannah, is shortly taking her passion for running to extremes by running off on 28 September to join the VLA team in Frankston.

Hannah commenced with us as a paralegal/receptionist three years ago but soon moved into a lawyer role after being admitted to practice. She quickly developed skills in a range of legal areas including family violence and consumer matters and has provided services to the Court and the health service in Benalla as part of our family violence prevention and health-justice activities. Hannahs bright personality and obvious intellect, combined with her culinary skills, added to the pleasure of working with her professionally.

During her time in Shepparton, Hannah has also participated in a number of community activities and organisations, making her also a valued member of the broader community. Her work with youth at the Haven and elsewhere has been particularly appreciated and her presence there will be sadly missed.

We wish Hannah every success with her career and know those wishes will be realised because she will make them happen. Bye Hannah, we will miss you, so please dont forget us up here in Shepp.

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13:36

Entries sought for Coal Creek Literary Festival The Star

THE Coal Creek Literary Festival will be running a number of writing competitions this year as part of the festival on Sunday, October 8.
The main competition will again be the Bert van Bedaf Memorial Award for the best short story.
Entrants can enter as many times as they like and each entry must have a $15 entry fee.
Bert was an integral part of getting the Coal Creek Literary Festival off the ground 10 years ago. After he died in 2010, the open short story competition was renamed to honour his memory.
The prize money was increased to $500 and has since drawn a high standard of entries. Now entering its seventh year, the Bert van Bedaf award has proved to be a popular part of the Coal Creek Literary festival with entries coming from all over Australia.
Entry forms can be downloaded from the www.coalcreekliteraryfestival.com or www.coalcreekcommunityparkandmuseum.com websites or pick up a hard copy from Coal Creek Community Park and Museum in Korumburra.
Conditions and entry fees are all on the entry form with tips from judge Peter Sharpe, a keen supporter of the Coal Creek Literary Festival since 2008.
He has been a presenting author, chaired a discussion panel and judged the Bert van Bedaf short story competition last year.
One of the most experienced book publishers in Australia, Peter has worked with and published for many multinational publishers including Thomas Nelson and Prentice Hall. He has served as managing director at the University of New South Wales Press, and has operated his own publishing company.
Peter has also edited and designed books, and has extensive book marketing experience. He has also written several books himself.
The festival will also be running the open poetry competition which offers a $200 prize and entries cost $10 per submission.
Poetry judge is Julie  Maclean who arrived in Australia in 1970 as an English dance and drama teacher, and obtained a position at the Leongatha Technical School.
Now based on the Surf Coast, Julie is widely recognised and is a published poet. Her published poetry collections include When I Saw Jimi (2013), Kiss Of The Viking (2014) and Lips That Did (2017). She has had her work published in anthologies and magazines including the Australian Poetry Journal, Overland, The Bond Street Review and Cordite Poetry Review.
Julie was one of the featured authors at the 2016 Coal Creek Literary Festival, and also judged the Open Poetry Prize that year. The committee of this years festival is delighted she has consented to judge the Open Poetry Prize again this year.
The competition is open to anyone with an imagination, a pen and paper or word processing program. Entry guidelines form part of the entry form which you can access online. Payment can be made by either Paypal, EFTPOS, cheque or by cash at the counter in Coal Creek Community Park and Museum.
Past winning entries have been posted on the Coal...

13:34

Lyric actors to show diverse talents The Star

IF we treat her as a corpse, of course she will die. Try a little kindness, lieutenant.
These are the words of Governor Phillip in Leongatha Lyric Theatres production of Our Countrys Good as he speaks of Liz Morden, played by Leanne Crimp.
Leanne says, Liz Morden is pretty intimidating when she rst joins the cast of convicts rehearsing for The Recruiting Ocer.
Shes had a very hard life. Her mother left when she was young and she had to care for the family, so she took in washing. Shes betrayed by her father who blamed her for a theft to save his own skin.
Publicly beaten and humiliated, she later became a small-time thief who was finally arrested, sentenced and sent to the other side of the world.
However, Liz discovers a hero in the progressive Governor Phillip who believes convicts should be treated humanely and, if treated as rational human beings, are reminded of their own goodness, talent and innate qualities of humanness.
Leanne said she loves Liz.
She has integrity, strength and humour, and shes a survivor. I am loving being in her skin, and I hope youll enjoy meeting her, she said.
In Our Countrys Good, the actors face the challenge of each playing a convict and an ocer. Using dierent accents for each, the actors are also able to show how ocers with power and authority walk and stand with condence, while convicts, no better than slaves, bear the marks of their hard life.
Todd Miller plays the Scottish, bad tempered Major Ross with energy, and then transforms into the servile, much hated Irish hangman, James Freeman.
David Tattersall, as Arthur Phillip, has to inspire all with his vision of a humane society, and then as the convict Arscott, bewails his fate while lying in chains.
Its a great story with all the humour and earthiness youd expect of a play inspired by Australias rst theatrical performance by convicts in 1789.
Our Countrys Good has mature themes. Performances are from September 29 to October 7. For tickets, phone Amy Smith on 0490 525 482 or buy online at www.lyrictheatre.net.au.

...

13:30

App helps children The Star

BASS Coast Specialist School was presented with 15 new iPads recently.
The iPads were donated by Variety, and included a specialised app to help students communicate.
The app called LAMP Words for Life is designed for non verbal or limited spoken language students to express themselves and contribute in the classroom.
It is suitable for Preps, as well as the older students. Speech pathologist Zoe Lowe said she had seen a benefit in using the app.
Weve used other apps and paper based systems, but this app has everything and has allowed students to ask for things and make comments on their own. I have noticed a difference; children who cant express themselves often feel frustrated and you start to see negative behaviour. This app helps them to express themselves through words so they dont need to use these behaviours, she said.
Getting these iPads is great because we can work with children who dont have their own device and there is one for each child.
Students began working with this app last year, and enjoyed investigating its features and having the power to communicate their thoughts and feelings. It soon became apparent the school needed the extra technology to use the app to its full potential.
The school applied for a grant valued at $15,000, and found out about their success last month.
At the moment, the iPads will be just for school. However, families are seeing results and have been keen to use this app at home, so we are working on a way for them to do so, Ms Lowe said.

Great app: from left, speech pathologist Zoe Lowe and Bass Coast Specialist School Prep students Oliver, Rhys and Landon explore the LAMP Words for Life app on one of the new iPads recently received by the school.

13:28

Bass Coast shows future looking shaky The Star

THE Bass Coast Agricultural Show is facing an uncertain future.
The show has always been hugely popular, moving from Dalyston to Wonthaggi 40 years ago. It has brought competition, entertainment and fun to the community year in and year out.
However, the Wonthaggi Agricultural and Pastoral Society hit a snag in its funds following the inclement weather at this years show in January.
We were rolling along nicely with great support from Bass Coast Shire Council, the societys Rosemary Loughnan said.
However, mandatory (occupational health and safety) costs go up, and these are things we cant ignore. It has become harder to make a dollar from sponsorships.
This is not the wealthiest of shires and we need to work together as volunteers. We do our very best and have been acknowledged as one of the best ag shows in the state.
This year we had a massive hit; the weather was atrocious. We are so proud of ourselves that nobody and no animals were injured. However, out of that came a massive hit and we count on the money from the gate to keep us in surplus.
Ms Loughnan appealed to Bass Coast Shire Council to review its ongoing support to the show.
The show has been part of a recurring grants program. The grants program allows events that successfully receive grants for two years to receive ongoing support without having to reapply for another grant.
The show has received $5000 from council yearly, but the grants program has never been reviewed.
We currently have around 40 events in the program, but a shortcoming of the program is that there is no review process at the end of each year. Longstanding events have started to fall behind in level of support because something changes during the year and the funds arent reassessed, councils events coordinator Frank Angarane said.
Im in the process of developing a program to review events and increase support where necessary.
Mr Angarane said he expects this process to be finalised in the next month for council to review.
In the meantime, Mrs Loughnan said the society had done what it could to save money for the next show.
Weve ripped the show apart and I believe we have saved where we can, she said.
We have found ourselves on shaky ground, but we are extremely positive we can keep working. We want to work with the shire and review our ongoing grant, which we do not take for granted. We are not ones to jump up and look to take money, but we are struggling at the moment. We have hit a rough patch in this Bass Coast weather.
Despite this, Mrs Loughnan said she hopes to reduce entry fees next year so as many families as possible can enjoy the show.
Its a bit controversial, but weve decided to pull back what we charge. Wed rather have a lot of people there than have people say they couldnt afford to go to the show, she said.
Some people never get out of Wonthaggi, so we bring that k...

13:24

Highway barriers to save lives The Star

VICROADS believes the proof centreline flexible safety barriers save lives is in the number of times the barriers have been repaired in Victoria after motorists collided with them.
The barriers are to be installed between Leongatha and Meeniyan, along the South Gippsland Highway, drawing substantial community opposition.
VicRoads has repaired flexible safety barriers in eastern Victoria about 300 times in the past year.
This has without doubt prevented potentially fatal and serious injury crashes from occurring as a result of someone crashing head on into another vehicle or running off the road, director of safe system road infrastructure program for VicRoads Bryan Sherritt said.
VicRoads believed the project would reduce the likelihood and severity of crashes between Leongatha and Meeniyan.
VicRoads said 85 percent of lives lost on country roads are currently the result of a vehicle running off the road to the left or crossing the centreline.
Flexible safety barriers reduce the risk of these crashes as the barriers prevent vehicles from crossing onto the wrong side of the road and crashing head on, or running off the road to the right.
Left hand side flexible safety barrier prevent vehicles from running off the road and hitting an object or rolling.
The project will also include widened and sealed road shoulders, road drainage improvements, and a minimum of 40m breaks in the safety barrier at property access points.
Along with that, included will be safer access to properties adjoining the highway, a sealed bell mouth area where highway and driveways meet, and resheeting/repair work to the existing pavement.
The project is part of the State Governments Towards Zero Road Safety Action Plan funded by the Transport Accident Commission.
Towards Zero is a vision for a future free of death and serious injury on our roads.
South Gippsland Highway has been identified as one of the top 20 roads highest risk rural roads.

Spreading word: from left, VicRoads Safer System Roads Infrastructure Program employees Dean Nugent and Rebecca Chase informed people of the reasoning behind the Leongatha to Meeniyan safety improvement project proposal at Leongatha Memorial Hall recently.

13:20

New jetty coming to life The Star

WORK on the Port Welshpool Long Jetty is progressing well, with contractor SMC Marine already installing concrete decking on the structure.
The inshore 190 metres has been partially rehabilitated to retain the appearance of the existing piles, crossheads and beams, while the decking will be been replaced with precast concrete slabs.
From 190 metres onwards to a distance of around 572 metres, the existing structure will be demolished and replaced.
It will follow the same alignment, with a new structure comprising timber piles and crossheads with a composite steel beam and concrete deck.
The slipway approach will be partially reconstructed in a similar manner to the jetty and the existing winch shed will be restored.
The remaining section of the jetty will be demolished, with the piles being cut off at two metres below low water to be retained as habitat.
The $11 million project is expected to take around 18 months to complete, and the rehabilitated and rebuilt jetty is expected to have a lifespan of at least 40 years.
As the community representative on the projects working group, Welshpools Paul Macphail is pleased to see the project finally underway after campaigning for the works for so many years.
It has been a long, hard, slow and sometimes frustrating road, so it is fantastic to see it happening even though it took so long, he said.
What SMC Marine has done so far looks great.
Peter Rose from Port Welshpool said the restoration of the Long Jetty was positive for locals and tourists.
It is exciting to see it all up and going. We are already getting people asking us to let them know when it is open so they can come down and see it, he said.
Mr Rose said he is looking forward to seeing people on the jetty again, be they on foot, in a wheelchair or with a pram. He said it will be accessible to everyone.
South Gippsland Shire Council mayor Cr Ray Argento said the project was on track for an October 2018 completion date.
We look forward to ensuring the jetty attracting more visitors to the region, once the project is complete, he said.
It will give the area a big boost in tourism and will provide a benefit to the economies of the small towns in the Corner Inlet region.
Cr Argento said both locals and visitors are keen to see the jetty finished so they can go fishing again.

13:20

Pauls recipe for success The Star

INVERLOCH is serving up success with the local Seniors football team winning its first premiership in 31 years on Saturday and local bakery Paul the Pieman winning a swag of medals in the 2017 Great Aussie Pie Competition, judged last week.
Footy finals time is the perfect time to hop into some great Aussie fare and Paul and Robyn Woods, owners of Paul the Pieman bakery are thrilled to be sharing their award winning pies and sausage rolls with their customers.
While Paul will tell you their good old meat pie is still their biggest seller many of their adventurous customers are keen to try their award winning varieties so this week they will be busy baking the winning recipes and filling their pie cabinets.
If you would like to sample success then head into Paul the Pieman and try the Gold Medal Gourmet Beef Wellington sausage roll and Paul let out the secret ingredient being a good smear of Maggie Beer pate. Paul is pleased with the gold medal and the fact that it came second overall but next year he is up for the challenge and is looking to take that top honour.
For lovers of pies the Silver medal plain mince, Penang Curry Pumpkin and Chicken Parma are all worth a go.
If you want to head back for seconds then the Choc Chilli Beef, Chicken Leek and Minted Lamb are all proving popular.
Paul and Robyn and their dedicated team are on a high this week after their success but they are all back hard at it in the kitchen to keep up with the increasing demand for their award winning delights.
Paul prides himself on the fact that what his customers are served up out of the pie heater is the exact same pie entered in the Aussie competition and they must be doing something right, serving up a grand total of 167,000 pies last year and the way the pies are rushing out the doors this year they may even top that.
We just try to do our best and we will get the results back this week and we will review these and see how we can improve and do even better next year, Paul said.
We try to offer a big variety so there is always something fresh and new for customers to try but of course we keep our favourites and best sellers too to keep our customers happy.
And their award winning products are all for the meat lovers, Paul and Robyn have come up with some delicious vegetarian pies and generally have five varieties on offer .
As for who comes up with the award winning recipes Paul said he and Robyn are always on the lookout for new ideas.
In the old days it was basically a matter of throwing the ingredients in a pot and adding a bit of thickener but now with all the reality cooking shows Paul said this has influenced major changes in the industry.
Paul enjoys watching Master Chef and getting ideas from the top chefs and still gets a buzz out of creating new recipes and sharing his passion with his customers.
So after more than 16 years entering the annual Aussie competition Paul...

13:19

9th Birthday Market Mansfield Farmers' Market

Its our birthday today . or it will be our 9th birthday market on Saturday this week!  Who would have thought that our little market that started off at Mansfield Primary School under the (newly completed) big roof would be the thriving market place that it is today?  We moved to our main street location nearly 4 years ago and have continued to grow since then.  Many thanks to our loyal shoppers who have supported us over the years buying direct from the farmer / producer helps small businesses grow. There are some stalls who started at our market but no longer attend often this is because they used the market to test their product and have now grown and moved onto bigger things!  What a great outcome!

Spring has sprung according to the calendar but we are still experiencing winter like weather.  Our big mountains Mt Buller and Mt Stirling are both experiencing Spring snow falls like they havent seen in many years. Mt Buller has extended their open season until the end of the school holidays and there is PLENTY of snow to ski / board / play in.  Make the most of it and head on up after the market or on Sunday.

A reminder that our market is now SMOKE FREE.  This legislation came into play on the 1st August and covers the whole market area.

We have a great line up of stallholders for Saturday 23rd check the list below.  Remember that many are happy to accept pre-orders and will put your shopping aside for you until you arrive at the market.  A win win!

Stallholders 23rd September (correct as at 19/9/2017)

  1. Aintree Almonds
  2. Boonderoo Farm Bread & pies
  3. Bottom of the Hill porridge
  4. Chocolaterie RenMar
  5. Earthy Wellbeing teas
  6. Garys veggies
  7. Gregs Seedlings
  8. Greta Valley Eggs
  9. Heirloom Naturally
  10. Jeddas Garden
  11. Jillicious back in October
  12. King Valley Walnuts
  13. Lamour de la crepes
  14. Lambtastic
  15. Long Lane Capers back in November
  16. Maindample Imperial Fudge
  17. Ninns Pantry
  18. Northern Slopes Plantation
  19. Mojo Muesli available from IGA
  20. Red Elk back in October
  21. Ros Ritchie Wines
  22. Social Bandit Brewing
  23. Swanpool Natives
  24. The Produce Store coffee...

13:19

Broiler farm objectors plea to council The Star

WOOREEN residents are concerned the approval of a broiler farm proposed for their rural district will lead to more poultry farming in South Gippsland.
South Gippsland Shire Council will consider a planning permit application to build a 400,000 bird farm in 10 sheds at 80 Pit Road at its September 27 council meeting.
The recommendation before council is to approve a permit, with a council officer report saying conditions to be applied will address amenity impacts.
The proposal has received more than 120 objections and one submission in support.
Objectors who have dubbed themselves the Wooreen Warriors will present at councils public presentation session tomorrow (Wednesday).
They are concerned about Boyle Creek will be contaminated by run-off, erosion, dust and increased truck traffic.
Dairy farmer Jackie Thorn urged council not to take the areas beauty for granted.
This is a creep of change and once the beautys gone, you cant fix it, she said.
Objector Kath Goller said, More than 12ha of that steep landscape will have to be reconfigured into an industrial landscape.
Its discordant with the character of the place and the current land uses.
She is worried about disease carrying dust landing on her roof and entering her water tank, and others believe such particles could affect the organic status of a nearby farm.
Isabelle Cooper said any contamination of Boyle Creek would end up in the Tarwin River Meeniyan and Dumbalks water supply.
We moved here because the council says to Come for the beauty, stay for the lifestyle and so we did, and now theyre going to stuff it up, she said.
Ms Goller is also concerned about the impact on wildlife in the waterways: freshwater crayfish, blackfish and freshwater mussels.
Tom Daffy and Deb Brown run Black Duck Farm bed and breakfast nearby, and believed the poultry farm would have negative impacts on their business.
Adele Upton and Mark Bradbury also run Waterfall Valley Retreat accommodation nearby and share similar concerns.
Ms Brown said, Were worried about the impact on the environment and also the noise and extra trucks on the road.
Mr Daffy said while the subject land may be zoned farming, he said broiler farms were factory farming.
They can call it rural but its an industrial complex, he said.
Objector Adele Upton said, There have already been landslips in the area because of all the rain.
It could be hard to enforce the conditions (on the permit) if there are any problems.
Peter Cooper believed the broiler farms location at the top of the Boyle Creek valley would amplify smell issues, saying the valley acts like a funnel.
The smell is going to come right down the valley, he said.

...

13:18

High pie recognition The Star

KELLYS Bakery serves mouth watering pies in Korumburra and their recent award proves that.
Bakery owner, Jason Kelly collected a silver medal for his slow cooked pork pie with smoky barbecue flavour at the Great Aussie Pie Competition held in Sydney last week.
Its good to win an award nationwide, Mr Kelly said.
Our pork pie is a new flavour and its quite nice.
Pies at Kellys Bakery are a huge hit with customers; the bakers make around 200 pies per day.
A new pie has been entered into the competition every year for 17 years, and almost every year the bakery has taken home an award.
The competition is judged over a four day period by an elite team of 16 judges from the baking industry.
Ten categories of pies are appraised including plain meat and chunky, gourmet meat/gourmet section including red meat, poultry, game, seafood, vegetarian, gluten free, breakfast and apple.

Delicious pies: Kellys Bakery bakers from left, Angus Cooney, David King, owner Jason Kelly and Stephan Williams received a silver award for their slow cooked pork pies with smoky barbecue flavour at the Great Aussie Pie Competition held in Sydney last week.

13:17

Burra Foods praises top farmers The Star

BURRA Foods honoured first class suppliers at an awards ceremony at the Korumburra Showgrounds last Tuesday, September 12.
The Korumburra-based milk processor presented Gold Quality Awards to farmers who had produced A Grade milk all season with average bulk milk cell count of less than 100,000, and Silver Quality Awards to farmers whose milk had a count of between 100,000 and 150,000.
Up to 50 new suppliers attended the open day, which included a tour of the factory to demonstrate the companys capabilities within the manufacturing sector.
Burra Foods Korumburra processing plant creates 50 to 70 products.
Burra Foods chief executive officer Grant Crothers said, It is an introduction to the new suppliers who have joined us recently, and get them to understand Burra more and what we do and how we do it, and give our new and existing suppliers an opportunity to have a look at the factory.
Quality assurance testing occurs on site and the company spends a lot of time refining processes to ensure customers are provided with the product they want.
Water is one of the plants biggest by-products and recovers around 80,000 litres of water per hour, of which around 10 percent is waste.
The plant has two million litres of storage on site, however is unable to operate self sufficiently at this stage as some processes cannot be completed with recycled water.
In terms of water use, the plant is currently about 70 percent efficient, but is working towards getting as close to 100 percent as possible.
This year, Burra Foods will process around 350 million litres, up about 20 percent on the last year and is currently processing around nine million litres per week.
The company now has more than 200 suppliers for the first time in its history.

Talented farmers: from left, Burra Foods Silver Quality milk suppliers, Brendan McGlead of Foster, Dee and Colin Hendrikse of Driffield, Rachael and Klara McGlead of Foster, Joe Meggetto of Warragul South, Graham Wildes of Yannathan, Jason and Zac McRae of Middle Tarwin, Kerrie Redmond of...

12:59

Jelbarts Caldermeade herd to sell The Star

THE Caldermeade Dairy and Cafe, which was owned by the Jelbart family has sold, after around 12 months on the market.
The entire milking herd of around 340 Holstein Friesian autumn calvers will be dispersed at a sale on Friday, October 6 at 10.30am at VLE Leongatha.
Tim Jelbart said the quality of the herd was a reflection of his late father Maxs dedication to using the best genetics to breed the best cows.
Dad was an industry leader and passionate about dairying. He started dairy farming in 1981 with 140 cows and now we milk 1400 cows between two farms, he said.
Tim said Maxs passionate commitment to the dairy industry was outstanding and was heavily involved on the boards of Murray Goulburn, Marcus Oldham College and Australian Dairy Farmers.
Max was also a president of the South Gippsland Branch of United Dairy Farmers of Victoria and a life member of the Nuffield Farmers Scholars Australia.
He was always willing to try new things, which meant he was always using top quality genetics to try and push production and longevity boundaries, Tim said.
He knew how to grow grass, everyone was always amazed at how much grass he could grow.
The herd is currently averaging around 33.5 litres per day, with 3.8 per cent fat, 3.5 per cent protein and a cell count of 100,000.
Sire groups selling include Medallion, Delsanto, Christmas, Gold Crown, Cardinal, Buddha with cows rejoined to Medallion, Royalman and Challenger.
Tim said each cow has been pregnancy tested, has full herd test records and three generations of pedigree reports.
The Jelbarts have been improving their herd through AI and Genetics Australia since the early 1990s.
For the past 25 years Gerard Brislin has worked with the Jelbart family as an adviser across the breeding program at Caldermeade Farm and Pound Creek, sharing ideas and thoughts with Max, whilst also being challenged by Maxs inquisitive mind.
Across the 25 years we have seen lots of changes in the world of dairy genetics, but the thing that hasnt changed was ensuring we maintain a strong focus on maximising productivity and economic returns against investment made around genetics, he said.
The Caldermeade herd is positioned in the top five per cent of the Holstein breed nationally when analysing herd records and data against the industries recognised economic index the Balanced Performance Index.
You dont just buy genetics, you invest in genetics and in the future of your dairy herd and this is very evident around the sale of this herd next month, Gerard said.
It has been a privilege to have played a role in developing this herd to where it is today.
Gerard strongly encouraged commercial dairy producers to get along and secure genetics that rarely come on to the open market.
Tim said the decision to sell the Caldermeade farm was made to consolidate the family business to focus on the original farm at Poun...

12:58

Tim shows his auctioneering flair The Star

TIM Gibson flew the flag for Alex Scott and Staffs Korumburra office in a recent state-wide auctioneering competition.
The livestock agent competed in the 2017 ALPA Victorian Young Auctioneers Competition at the Victorian Livestock Exchange at Pakenham.
The event was hosted by the Australian Livestock and Property Agents Association and saw contestants auction three pens at a live sale.
Mr Gibson, of Bunyip, services Alex Scotts Korumburra office.
The event was won by Murray Bennett of Landmark Wangaratta and runner-up was Joe Allen from Elders Euroa.
I was glad I did it as its given me the opportunity to polish my auctioneering skills, Mr Gibson said.
Looking back to six months ago, I have improved since then.
Candidates were assessed on clarity, introduction, patter and knockdown.
So you have got a lot of things to think about while you are doing it, Mr Gibson said.
The final pool of competitors was selected at an ALPA auctioneers school at Bendigo in June.

12:57

Expo excitement builds The Star

THE Strzelecki Lions Club is proud to be hosting the South Gippsland Dairy Expo in Korumburra on September 27 and 28.
The event will open at 9am and close at 3.30pm on both days.
Entry is $10 per person and children under 16 are free.
The Dairy Expo started in 2000 with the committee having a core objective to deliver a one stop shop to local farmers so that if they were busy they could visit, do their business and leave after a valuable couple of hours of researching.
This years event will have the same focus.
The Dairy Expo provides an opportunity for members of the dairying fraternity to be able to showcase the latest in dairy innovation and technology to local farmers.
The Dairy Expo could not happen without the loyal support of major sponsor Murray Goulburn and MG Trading.
This relationship has been in place for 17 years, and everyone is encouraged to call in and visit their hospitality area and have a chat with the enthusiastic team.
South Gippsland is lucky to be home of some exceptional dairy farm enterprises which form a significant part of the rural community.
The Dairy Expo would not be an 18 year success story without the tremendous support and help from its community and volunteers.
The Korumburra Rotary Club will be in charge of the Kids Activity Pavilion.
This will include some farm animal pens, cow moulds for painting, a dairy dress up corner and much more, so be sure to bring the children along to enjoy these free activities.
A big thank you goes to Parmalat, that sponsored the Kids Activity Pavilion and offered this free entertainment for the children.
The Dairy Expo is an event organised and run by volunteers. Each year, enthusiastic parents and volunteers from the Poowong Kindergarten organise the catering for all attendees.
The Strzelecki Lions Club would like to thank the other community volunteers who assist with the event each year.
Matt Harms will be hosting a session sponsored by South Gippsland Shire Council and Rabobank on September 27 at 11am.
The session is titled Our prediction for the coming season is unpredictable.
The session will cover milk prices, season, illnesses and other external factors that are highly unpredictable, and attendees will hear how others have previously managed these pressures. When thrown an unpredictable event, how have they persisted and strengthened their business to withstand future events?
Panel members will share their experiences, how their businesses have performed under pressure, and how they have come out trumps.
The panel members include Yannathans Dean Turner, Inverlochs Warren and Kerrie Redmond, South Gippsland Shire Councils Penni Ellicott, Rabobanks Jamie Murphy and Outtrims Andrew and Sue Lamers.
For exciting news, the Udder Truth Showbags sponsored by South East Organic Fertiliser are back.
The participating exhibitors are extremely enthusia...

12:53

Knights stay strong against Lang Lang The Star

LEONGATHA Knights Reserves took on Lang Lang United in a replay of last years Reserves grand final.
Knights and United last played out a four all draw.
The Knights had regular Reserves keeper Shem Murphy in goal and he was tested early when a clearance ricocheted off a Lang Lang player and looked like going in.
Shem was tuned in and was able to make a great save.
Knights started the match with Tom Barker, Tom Rycks, David Simon and Curtis Rintoule in defence.
This represents the strongest defensive four that the Knights team have fielded.
The Leongatha side was able to get the first goal of the match when the Lang Lang keeper came out to a long ball but was only able to clear the ball back into general play, whereby Stuart McNaughton was able to run onto the ball and make a strike that beat the scrambling defenders.
Chris Gale was substituted for Sean Villasevil the Knights attack started to fire.
Matt Wardle and Sean caused some problems for the Lang Lang defenders.
Captain Brian Gannon received the ball in the midfield, quickly turned his marker and put through a long ball for Sean to run on to.
The shot beat the keeper for the Knights second goal of the day.
Knights had a Stuart, Brian, Wade Bashaw and Chris Wightman holding the midfield and utilising their passing game to allow Sean and Matt to run onto a number of balls, but the United keeper was able to continue to get a hand on the ball.
The second half saw the introduction of Paul Wynne, with Leongatha looking to continue to hold the ball and attack the Lang Lang goal.
The Knights day looked complete when Stuart took a run down the left wing and on his left was able to put the ball high in to the Lang Lang net.
Lang Lang started to respond and when an attacker made a run down the right wing he was able to cross it for a regulation goal.
The Knights were able to get the score back on their side when Chris Gale took a corner only for Lang Lang to clear it out to Brian who was waiting at the top of the square.
His left foot shot through the heavy defence had the keeper unsighted and rebounded in off the left hand goal post.
Brian was taken down inside the box and given a penalty, though the United keeper was able to get a hand on the shot and parry it wide.
Lang Lang found some run, with all out attack they pushed nearly everyone forwards
The long ball in behind the defence allowed the United side to score against the flow and suddenly they had their backs up.
Again the Lang Lang side surged forward and with a long throw down the line, a cross and a goal meant that suddenly they had tightened up the game.
It wasnt long before the whistle blew for full time.
It was four to three in favour of the Knights.
Lang Lang again proved what a tough side they are to play against.
A grand final now beckons and the Leongatha Knights will play Phillip Islan...

12:52

Gymnasts shine, both young and old The Star

TERM 3 has been a successful one for Leongatha Gymnastics Clubs competitive gymnasts.
Head coach Miranda has competed at two Masters events on the July 8 and August 27.
Masters gymnastics is open to anyone over the age of 18.
Miranda did an amazing job finishing first on all events and first overall at the Wesley Competition and finished with five firsts, three seconds and second overall at the Knox Masters competition.
Miranda now has her sights set on the Australian Masters Games in Tasmania in October.
The club wishes her the best of luck.
Leongatha Gymnastics Clubs junior and senior gymnasts have also started the competition season with great results at the Energetic Cup held in Maffra on Saturday, September 2.
For many of the gymnasts this was their first competition ever.
Level 1s did extremely well to overcome nerves and had a great time coming 11th.
Level 2 blue team came sixth overall with a fifth place on bar, green team came 10th.
Level 3 came 12th overall with a third on vault.
Level 4 came fourth overall with a fifth of beam and floor, third on bar and first on vault.
Level 5 came third overall and third on each apparatus.
Gymnasts attending Leongatha Gymnastics Club come from all over South Gippsland and Bass Coast, including Phillip Island.

Great job: Leongatha Gymnastics Club was well represented at a recent competition.

12:49

Swimmers amaze at championships The Star

A DEDICATED team of 18 swimmers from South Gippsland Bass Swimming Club joined the best swimmers from all over country Victoria in Wangaratta for the 2017 Victorian Country Short Course Championships recently.
An all round effort across the two days of racing culminated in a sixth place overall finish.
This is the clubs best result at a Victorian Country Championship.
An exceptional result for the club was the boys category, where it finished second overall.
The 2017 South Gippsland Bass Victorian Country Short Course Championship team comprised the following swimmers; Belinda Baird, Tomei Dal Pozzo, Locke DeGaris, Elle Douglas, Nathan Foote, Riley Harris, Oscar Hughes, Freya Liepa, Sophie McKenzie, Dylan Muir, Trinity OKeefe, Isabelle ONeill, Cooper Quaife, Hannah Simmons, Jordi Vanderkolk, Mayson Vanderkolk, Joshua Wight and Nicolette Wight.
The coaches were Brett Kerr and Dylan Muir.
An outstanding medal haul was led by captain Nathan Foote, who dominated with three gold, one silver and one bronze.
Cooper Quaife excelled with one gold and three bronze and Locke DeGaris brought home two silver and two bronze.
Sophie McKenzie, Nicolette Wight and Dylan Muir secured a silver medal each, whilst Trinity OKeefe and Joshua Wight came away with bronze.
Eleven swimmers had top eight finishes spread over 40 races.
The club now looks ahead to the Victorian Age and Open Short Course Championships at the Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre, where the swimmers will continue to extend themselves and excel.

Medal haul: captain Nathan Foote and Locke DeGaris impressively represented South Gippsland Bass Swimming Club at the 2017 Victorian Country Short Course Championships in Wangaratta recently. The club was represented by a team of 18.

12:48

Thrilling grand final results on the courts The Star

A Grade
WITH Korumburra Bena undefeated all season, accounting for the Dalyston in both home and away game and Dalyston losing the first week of finals, the Giants came in as heavy favourites.
However, Dalyston thrive on the underdog status and love nothing more than taking on Korumburra Bena in big finals.
The crowd must have known this too, as they were packed in five and six deep around the courts, in anticipation of a great game.
Dalyston came out of the blocks firing on all cylinders.
They jumped to a five to one lead, making much more out of their opportunities than the Giants.
Giants coach Christie Hillberg (GA) opted to make no changes at quarter time, backed her starting seven in and looked to be the right choice, grabbing the first two goals of the quarter but thats when the momentum swung in Dalystons favour.
Dalyston had the Giants rattled and half time couldnt come quick enough for Giants girls, Dalyston nine up at the main break.
There was expectation in the air that this would be quarter the Giants would get back into the game.
However it was Dalyston who took the initiative at the start of the quarter, getting the first two goals and the lead out to 11.
It was the massive work rate and pressure of the Dalyston midcourt that was keeping the Giants at bay.
Dalyston had a steely look of determination at start of the last, personified by Alana McRae and her repeated efforts in defence and chasing down numerous loose balls.
Dalyston had it in the bag with half the quarter left to play.
Best on court: Jarney Thomas (Dalyston).
B Grade
WITH the Giants giving Dalyston a 35 goal trouncing in the second semi final, it was going to be very interesting to see how they would respond.
It was a fast start to the game, the ball whizzing up and down the court.
The Giants up four at the first break.
The Giants controlled the momentum of the game, doubling their quarter time score to lead by eight at half time.
It is said the third quarter is the premiership quarter and it certainly was the case here; the Giants winning all positions on the court.
It was going to take a big effort for Dalyston to get back into the game and they certainly gave it a shake.
The Giant settled with number of goals of intercepts and the game was well out of Dalystons reach, taking the win by 10 goals and making it back to back premierships for Giants.
Best on court: Jamie-Lee Jeffs (Korumburra Bena).
C Grade
WITH Koo Wee Rup causing an upset in the second semi, beating Dalyston by three goals, the stage was set for a Dalyston come back.
The game was a scrappy start; a heavy shower didnt help the situation, both teams with a number of unforced errors.
The Demons were up one at the main break.
Dalyston started the third with a lot more energy and talk than previous quarters. Dalyston held a three goal lead...

12:45

IK bring home the cup The Star

THE Sea Eagles ran away with a premiership win, thumping new rivals Cora Lynn in the all important grand final clash.
From Clint McCaughans first goal six minutes into the opening quarter, IK had full control of the game.
With the wind advantage in the first quarter, IK kicked four goals through Tom Bartholomew, Tom Hams and Toby Mahoney.
Mahoney had an extraordinary game, picking up the best on ground medal at the end of the match and kicking a whopping four goals for the day.
The Cobras were silenced for the opening quarter, kicking one behind.
Supporters were keen to see what the second quarter would bring, expecting the wind advantage would give the Cobras the break it needed to catch up.
However, IK was hungry for its first premiership victory since 1986, and kept the Cobras to a low two goals.
IK was looking to remain scoreless for the quarter, but Mahoney and William Hetherington kicked two late goals to see out the quarter.
IK retained a four goal lead heading into the long break.
After recharging the batteries, IK was back at it, slamming four more goals past the sticks.
Meanwhile the defence worked hard to ensure the Cobras stayed down, only allowing one major for the quarter.
IK really drove the win home in the final quarter. Giving their all and inspiring their supporters, IK finished the game off with a massive eight goal haul.
Adam Cross kicked off the barrage of goals 47 seconds into the last quarter, opening the flood gates for Shem Hawking, Mahoney, Tom Wyatt, Daniel Houston and Dylan Clark to follow his lead.
Corey Casey solidified the win with one final goal at the 16 minute mark, 10 minutes before the siren.
IK celebrated a massive 95 point premiership win.
Back in the rooms, coach Ben Soumilas encouraged his team to be humble in their win, and to share the moment with all the people who supported them through their footy careers.

Massive moment: Inverloch Kongwak captain Dale Lawton and coach Ben Soumilas raised the premiership cup in victory on Saturday.

12:41

Vernon leads Parrots into third grand final battle The Star

WITH the grand final showdown less than a week away, Leongatha Parrots Seniors coach Beau Vernon is hoping third time is a lucky charm for this team.
Since Vernon took on the coachs role in 2015, the Parrots have featured in the grand final dance. However, they are yet to take home the silverware.
Vernon is waiting on Saturday with high anticipation.
Im excited; finals season is a great time of the year, he said.
Im a Richmond supporter so Im up and about at the moment. The team has a good clean bill of health and they are ready to go.
When asked if he believed the team had a shot at taking home the premiership win, Vernon said he would be taking the match quarter by quarter.
We arent looking at the final outcome just yet. We are just going to go out there and enjoy it for what it is, he said.
This year has been exciting for us. Weve got a lot of really good young players. Theyve come up from juniors and developed through to the Seniors. They have great energy.
Vernon said there was no doubt his coaching technique had changed over the years.
You learn a lot about footy and yourself (when youre coaching), he said.
The game and the techniques are always evolving, so youre always going to grow and find different aspects to try.
Leongatha will be coming up against Maffra this weekend, which has been a strong contender all year.
Both teams have won a game against each other this year, making the grand final the ultimate decider.
In the lead up to the game, Vernon said the boys would continue to train as normal.
Off the field, Vernon has continued to do public speaking, and recently finished his business degree. Between family and football commitments, this time of year has been full on.
I dont have any special techniques for juggling it all, I just take it as anyone else would, he said.
While no decisions have been made as to whether he will return to the coaching position next year, he has enjoyed his time and the support from the club.
To help get the boys ready for the big game, the community is invited to join the Parrots for a club dinner on Thursday night.
Its $15 for meals and dessert, which kicks off at 7pm.
The club would appreciate the support and to see the community getting behind the grand final teams.

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"GroovUs Feed Aradio" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Arts" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Cvic" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Cvic" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Food" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Melbourne" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Melbourne" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Nsw" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Nsw" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Politics.au" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Sydney" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Vic" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
"IndyWatch Feed Vic" XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
2REM 107.3FM XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Alan Lappin XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
an appreciation of the Bogong bioregion XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Artwork by scentedglitter XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Australian Alps National Parks XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Borderline Albury Wodonga XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Callum Watson's Podcast XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Concerts & Gig Guide in Shepparton XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Focus On Fauna XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Goulburn Valley Community Legal Centre XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Goulburn Valley Pride Inc. XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
GREG'S LEGACY XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
http://corryongcourier.com.au/feed/ XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
http://flyfishingupdates.com/feed/ XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
http://www.alpineradio.com.au/feed/ XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
http://www.eventfinda.com.au/feed/events/shepparton/markets-fairs/upcoming.rss XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
http://www.mcivorfarmautumnfestival.com.au/feed/ XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
https://bensocdance.wordpress.com/feed/ XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Jims-Life-Log XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Katie Writes Stuff XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Mansfield Farmers' Market XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Mulberry Tree Farm XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
News - Voices for Indi XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Radio Mansfield 99.7FM XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
Shepparton Interfaith Network XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
the food eXchange radio show XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
The Shepparton Adviser XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
The Situation Albury-Wodonga XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
The Situation Seymour XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
The Situation Shepparton XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
The Situation Wangaratta XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September
The Star XML 05:43, Sunday, 24 September 06:43, Sunday, 24 September

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